FDA Approves the First Generic ARB This Week

More  great news the generic medication front.  One of the key classes of medications we use in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and diabetes are the Angiotensin 2 Receptor Blockers (ARBs).  The first drug to market in this class was losartin, marketed as Cozaar by Merck.  Teva Pharmaceuticals, one of the largest generic drug companies, was granted FDA approval this week to sell generic losartin (see losartin side effects) in all of the same doses as Cozaar, and as a combination drug with hydrochlorothiazide like Hyzaar.  In the treatment of hypertension the ARBs have been one of the last key drug classes without an inexpensive generic  option until now.  This will be great for our seniors on fixed incomes, and for keeping the drug costs of chronic disease management down. One of the key uses of the ARBs is in patients with cough as an adverse effect of an Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor.

Medpage today has a good article on this news:

FDA Approves First Generic ARBs
By Cole Petrochko, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: April 09, 2010
WASHINGTON — The FDA has approved generic versions of two antihypertensives: losartan potassium (Cozaar) and the combination drug losartan potassium and hydrochlorothiazide (Hyzaar).The two drugs are the first generic angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) to win FDA approval.

Full article here

More good news is that the patent for Avapro, an even more popular ARB than Cozaar,  expires in 2010 also.

Also read Pharmaceutical Companies Need to Keep Prices High to Support R&D – Not!

2 Responses to FDA Approves the First Generic ARB This Week

  1. Ed Pullen says:

    I have to agree that Cozaar is not my favorite ARB, but I think it just needs to be used in high dose and twice daily dosing. I’m glad Avapro is not far away.

  2. David Lubin, MD says:

    Problem is that Cozaar and Hyzaar, in my experience, are pretty much like using placebo as far as being effective BP medications. At least it’s better than nothing for patients who need one and can’t afford the price of brand name ARBs. One day, maybe for the next generation of primary care physicians, there will be generics for ALL expensive brand name meds.

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