Author Archives: Dr. Pullen

Two Editorials on Drug Price Gouging from AFP

Today I was catching up on reading some past American Family Physician journals, and in the July 1, 2017 issue are two excellent editorials addressing drug prices charged by pharmaceutical companies in the U.S.  They are quick reads, free to anyone to access, and worth checking out:

 

Problematic Jumps in Drug Prices and What You Can Do.  by Allen F Shaughnessy, PharmD, Tufts University School of Medicine.

A brief exerpt:  “The industry also claims that revenue is plowed back into research and development…  the major pharmaceutical companies spend more on sales and marketing ($5.2 billion in 2015) than they do on research and development.

Drug Price Gouging: When Will It End? by Jay Siwek, MD, Georgetown University Medical Center

This is a very brief, one column, scathing critique of drug pricing.

What You Should Know about the New Shingles Vaccine, Shingrix.

Last week a new vaccine for prevention of shingles was not only approved by the FDA, but the CDC recommended vaccination of everyone over age 50 with Shingrix, revaccination with Shingrix if you have previously received the older shingles vaccine Zostrix, and expressed preference for Shingrix over Zostavax.  Shingrix has approval and recommendation for use… Continue Reading

Medical Alert USB Bracelets or QR Codes

I think of myself as fairly tech-savvy but somehow I have missed out on a pretty basic tech health item.  I saw a patient yesterday with Acute Intermittent Porphyria, who was kind enough to let me photograph her USB Medical Alert Bracelet. These make lots of sense for persons with conditions who might benefit from… Continue Reading

Top 20 Research Studies of 2015- AFP Article

I read the American Family Physician fairly regularly and sometimes I come across an article good enough to summarize here.  In the May 1, 2016 issue is an article titled, “Top 20 Research Studies of 2015 for Primary Care Physicians.”  In each AFP is a section called POEMs, for “Patient Oriented Evidence that Matters,” and… Continue Reading

A Better Approach to Diet for Type 2 Diabetes

For years I’ve sent my newly diagnosed and poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes to diabetes education classes.  There they are taught many helpful skills, including how to test their blood sugars at home, how to watch for complications of diabetes like foot ulcers and infections, and a big focus is on how to… Continue Reading

Overoutrage: The Right Way to Determine Healthcare Policy?

I came across a very interesting article today in The Health Care Blog by Saurabh Jah, MD titled Overoutrage and the Assymetric Skepticism of Healthcare Journalists. This addresses a concept I’d not heard of until now. Here is a quote from the above linked article: “Overoutrage is excessive moral outrage. Outrage is excessive anger. Anger is… Continue Reading